Special Promotion starts today...Valid until June 30, 2014

Purchase 3 Digital downloads to the value of 26.85 and get 30% off your order.

Tips for effective landscape photography

06th May 2014
Tips for effective landscape photography
• One or more foreground objects will give the impression of three-dimensionality, and can help to frame the scene. Depth is achieved by combining foreground, middle ground and background objects.
• Compose the image so that it contains a centre of interest - an object that draws the viewer's eye into the picture.
• Placing the centre of interest off-centre, in accordance with the Rule of Thirds, will create a harmonious composition.
• Placing the horizon a third of the way down from the top or bottom of the frame is usually much better than having it in the middle of the scene.
• Scale can often be important to the understanding of a landscape, and can be achieved by including an object of a known size in the scene.
• The quality of the light is perhaps the most influential attribute of a successful landscape. Waiting for interesting lighting that is moody, dramatic or diffused usually pays off in a memorable photograph. Top landscape photographers will often return again and again to a location until lighting conditions are just right.
• Ensure that your camera's flash is turned off when shooting landscapes, unless you require it to brighten a foreground object. Flash in a dusty, misty or foggy scene may cause flare by reflecting off the droplets of moisture or dust particles.
• Use a tripod to ensure sharpness, especially in low-light conditions.
• In very low light, be sure to select a fast film speed or a high ISO sensitivity setting in your digital camera that will permit proper exposure and good depth of field.
• Watch for unsightly or unnatural elements such as overhead wires, hydrants, poles and garbage cans, especially in the foreground. If you cannot easily move them, reposition yourself to a camera angle that eliminates them from the frame.

• Don't let the weather stop you from capturing an attractive landscape. Rain can add a degree of softness and peacefulness to a scene. On an overcast day, be sure your scene has an area of colour in it to counteract the overall dull lighting.
• Keep the rules of composition in mind when framing a scene. Lines, in particular, can be a strong factor in making an interesting landscape. An awareness and the judicious placement of planes in the scene can also be factors in improving your composition.
• Landscape photography is often more horizontal than it is vertical, presenting the opportunity to shoot a panorama. If you are faced with a wide vista and your camera has a panorama mode, this is the time to select it. Cropping afterwards can achieve a similar purpose.
• When the wind is blowing or water is moving - waves, waterfalls, a tumbling brook - capturing that movement by using a slow shutter speed to create blur can add great interest to a landscape. When selecting a slow shutter speed, be sure you retain proper exposure by also appropriately adjusting your camera's aperture. Many cameras will do this automatically for you in Shutter Priority mode.

Leave a comment

Your Name
Your Email
(Optional)
Your Comment
No info required here, please press the button below.